The Cuckoo's Calling (A Cormoran Strike wholesale Novel, outlet online sale 1) online

The Cuckoo's Calling (A Cormoran Strike wholesale Novel, outlet online sale 1) online

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The Cuckoo''s Calling is a 2013 crime fiction novel by J. K. Rowling, published under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith.

A brilliant mystery in a classic vein: Detective Cormoran Strike investigates a supermodel''s suicide.
After losing his leg to a land mine in Afghanistan, Cormoran Strike is barely scraping by as a private investigator. Strike is down to one client, and creditors are calling. He has also just broken up with his longtime girlfriend and is living in his office.

Then John Bristow walks through his door with an amazing story: His sister, thelegendary supermodel Lula Landry, known to her friends as the Cuckoo, famously fell to her death a few months earlier. The police ruled it a suicide, but John refuses to believe that. The case plunges Strike into the world of multimillionaire beauties, rock-star boyfriends, and desperate designers, and it introduces him to every variety of pleasure, enticement, seduction, and delusion known to man.

You may think you know detectives, but you''ve never met one quite like Strike. You may think you know about the wealthy and famous, but you''ve never seen them under an investigation like this.

From Booklist

London PI Cormoran Strike’s final feud with his arguably insane fiancée leaves him camping in his office, wondering how his last two clients will keep him afloat and pay for his new secretary, Robin. When a childhood acquaintance asks him to investigate his supermodel sister’s apparent suicide, Strike finds a distraction from his problems that’s happily attached to a check. Lula Landry was surrounded by rabid paparazzi, a drug-addled social circle, a dysfunctional adopted family, and a shifty, newly found birth mother, making suicidal despair hard to dismiss. But with Robin’s surprisingly adept assistance, Strike dismantles witness statements, applying masterful deductive skills to find evidence of murder. This debut is instantly absorbing, featuring a detective facing crumbling circumstances with resolve instead of clichéd self-destruction and a lovable sidekick with contagious enthusiasm for detection. Galbraith nimbly sidesteps celebrity superficiality, instead exploring the ugly truths in Lula’s six degrees of separation. Strike bears little resemblance to Jackson Brodie, but Kate Atkinson’s fans will appreciate his reliance on deduction and observation along with Galbraith’s skilled storytelling. --Christine Tran

Review

"One of the books of the year."― USA Today

"Robert Galbraith has written a highly entertaining book... Even better, he has introduced an appealing protagonist in Strike, who''s sure to be the star of many sequels to come.... its narrative moves forward with propulsive suspense. More important, Strike and his now-permanent assistant, Robin (playing Nora to his Nick, Salander to his Blomkvist), have become a team - a team whose further adventures the reader cannot help eagerly awaiting."― Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

"Rowling switches genres seamlessly...a gritty, absorbing tale."― People (3.5/4 stars)

"[Rowling''s] literary gift is on display in this work. She crafts an entertaining story [and] comes up with an ending that I''ll admit I was surprised by. . . . A fun read, with a main character you can care about and one you''ll want to see again in other adventures."― Washington Post

"An extravagant, alien, fascinating world for its characters to explore...great pleasures."― Slate

"a strong and enticing read ... It''s a gripping tale set in bustling London, and the author - whether called Galbraith or Rowling - shows superb flair as a mystery writer"
Irish Examiner

"It''s really, really good - beautifully written with a terrific plot ... It''s a terrific read, gripping, original and funny ... Please, please give us more of Robert Galbraith and Cormoran Strike. I can''t wait for the next"― Richard & Judy, Daily Express

About the Author

Robert Galbraith is a pseudonym for J.K. Rowling, author of the Harry Potter series and The Casual Vacancy.

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Top reviews from the United States

Ciaran
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
No plot development or suspense.
Reviewed in the United States on July 9, 2018
Oh boy, quite possibly the worst book I’ve ever managed to finish reading; I only finished it because it is the book of the month for our book club at work. Galbraith (Rowling) writes beautiful passages at times but describing every person and scene in intense detail does... See more
Oh boy, quite possibly the worst book I’ve ever managed to finish reading; I only finished it because it is the book of the month for our book club at work. Galbraith (Rowling) writes beautiful passages at times but describing every person and scene in intense detail does not make a great book.

What is lacking for 350 of the 400+ pages is any kind of plot development. A private eye novel should build suspense and constantly have the reader wondering what the next clue means. Instead we follow Strike the protagonist through a series of meetings that lead to no conclusions and no questions for the reader to ponder beyond “why am I reading this book?”

Rowling should stick with a Harry Potter, that series was excellent.
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Deborah Stachowiecz
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Disappointing “Adult” Novel Full Of Foul Language & Violence
Reviewed in the United States on May 9, 2019
I was very disappointed with this book after having read J K Rowling for so many years with great enjoyment. The language used by the characters was atrocious and the violence far too “dirty” like she was trying to prove this was an “adult” story. Good character... See more
I was very disappointed with this book after having read J K Rowling for so many years with great enjoyment. The language used by the characters was atrocious and the violence far too “dirty” like she was trying to prove this was an “adult” story. Good character possibilities and good plotting for the mystery could barely keep me going to finish it. I kept waiting for J K to reappear. The two major characters were just engaging enough to get me to start the second book in the series, hoping the atrocious language was more a function of the personas of the bad guys in the storyline. At first it appeared that might be the case. Unfortunately a major part of this storyline revolves around a novel full of degradation and aberrant sex that she insisted on describing in greater and greater detail. Finally I just gave up. I read for pleasure. Not to end up feeling dirty and repulsed. As I said I am SO disappointed being “adult” has taken such a dark turn in this talented writer.
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GossamerWriter
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good Characters, Below Average Mystery
Reviewed in the United States on March 4, 2018
I read The Cuckoo’s Calling to fulfill the prompt of A book with a female author who uses a male pseudonym (in this case, J. K. Rowling) for the 2018 POPSUGAR Reading Challenge. The first in a series of detective novels, this is the Introduction of Cormoran... See more
I read The Cuckoo’s Calling to fulfill the prompt of A book with a female author who uses a male pseudonym (in this case, J. K. Rowling) for the 2018 POPSUGAR Reading Challenge.

The first in a series of detective novels, this is the Introduction of Cormoran Strike, a private investigator who has seen better days: he’s previously lost half a leg in Afghanistan, loses his longtime girlfriend as the novel begins, is receiving death threats from a former client, and is down to a single client and facing mounting debt.

The arrival of his new temporary secretary, Robin, ushers in a season of change for both of them. Soon, Strike is hired by the brother of a supermodel who famously fell to her death from the balcony of her third-floor flat 3 months prior. Her brother—who also happens to be the brother of one of Strike’s friends who died as a child—offers a great deal of money to Strike to prove Lula’s death was not suicide, but murder.

There are lots of twists and turns in the mystery/investigation, and the prerequisite number of red herrings floating about. I honestly was less impressed by the mystery and its outcome (throwing away things that don’t make sense by way of virtually saying, “Who knows what goes through the mind of a psychopath?” is the sign of a lazy or incompetent author, and Rowling is normally not either) than I was by the characters of Cormoran and Robin, though I did feel a lot more development could have happened with them, but considering the book was already close to 600 pages and the pacing seemed to drag at times, perhaps it is best Rowling/Galbraith saved some for future books in the series.

Based on the strength of the main characters and some of the peripheral ones, I gave this 4 out of 5 stars, and will be picking up the next book in the series to see how these characters continue to develop.
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Magical Me
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Adoption— tired and unfounded biases
Reviewed in the United States on October 4, 2018
JK Rowling has some biases about adoption that I think need some looking into. The abnormal adopted child trope should have been examined and discarded long ago, but here it is, in play in yet another one of Rowling’s books. She is not alone of course, 4 out of 5 of the... See more
JK Rowling has some biases about adoption that I think need some looking into. The abnormal adopted child trope should have been examined and discarded long ago, but here it is, in play in yet another one of Rowling’s books. She is not alone of course, 4 out of 5 of the mystery series I have picked up to read in the last few years have all used adoptions gone wrong as a plot device. Rowling is usually good at standing up for the underdog, but in this book (and in the Potter series as well) she supports the negative unexamined myths and biases about adoption in Western culture. Really disappointing. The black people in the story were disproportionately depicted in negative stereotypical ways too.
As for the rest of the book, I don’t have much to add that hasn’t been said already. It’s a bit long, perhaps overly descriptive at times, but the characters are solid and interesting. Hard for me to recommend a plot that relies on bigotry to come together though.
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Happy ReaderTop Contributor: Doctor Who
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wrapped Myself Up in This Mystery - a Good Read!
Reviewed in the United States on September 13, 2018
At No 18 Rentigern Gardens, Mayfair Street, the stunning super-model Lula Landry jumps off the penthouse apartment balcony to die on the pavement below. The reporters go crazy: "They wrote that she was unbalanced, unstable, unsuited to the superstardom her wildness and her... See more
At No 18 Rentigern Gardens, Mayfair Street, the stunning super-model Lula Landry jumps off the penthouse apartment balcony to die on the pavement below. The reporters go crazy: "They wrote that she was unbalanced, unstable, unsuited to the superstardom her wildness and her beauty had snared; that she had moved among an immoral moneyed class that had corrupted her; that the decadence of her new life had unhinged an already fragile personality. She became a morality tale stiff with Schadenfreude, and so many columnists made allusion to Icarus that "Private Eye" ran a special column.
...And then, at last, the frenzy wore itself into staleness, and even the journalists had nothing left to say, but that too much had been said already."

Three months later, the office of Cormoran Strike, private investigator, is blessed with its 1st client in 3 weeks. It''s John Bristow, Lula''s brother, and he is adamant that she did not commit suicide. Cormoran takes the case. It''s going to get messy.

"The Cuckoo''s Calling" is the first in Robert Galbraith''s Cormoran Strike mystery series. I very much enjoyed it. It is, perhaps, a little drawn out (it''s 466 pages), but the plotting is good. More particularly, the characters are exceptionally well-drawn: "She was wearing tight jeans on long, slightly bandy legs, a black vest, several fine gold chains around her neck, rings on her fingers and thumbs, and also what looked like black leather ballet shoes. This kind of footwear always had a slightly anaphrodisiac effect of Strike, because it reminded him of the fold-up slippers his Aunt Joan used to carry in her handbag, and therefore of bunions and corns."

I have not yet seen the TV mystery series based on the books, called "Strike". Season 1 combines the first two mystery novels in the series, and originally aired in August 2017. Looking at the photos, I think the actor Tom Burke uglied himself up a bit, but he''s still too good looking for the Cormoran Strike of the books: "The reflection staring back at him was not handsome. Strike had the high, bulging forehead, broad nose and thick brows of a young Beethoven who had taken to boxing, an impression only heightened by the swelling and blackening eye.... He looked older than his thirty-five years."

This is simply a good read.

Happy Reader
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Michael Haywood
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very slow but potential is there
Reviewed in the United States on April 21, 2016
There are flashes of brilliance but for the most part, It''s a very slow and drawn out book. The slowness makes it tough to read and you will without a doubt want to put it down several times when reading it because of it. The plot is pretty straight forward for a detective... See more
There are flashes of brilliance but for the most part, It''s a very slow and drawn out book. The slowness makes it tough to read and you will without a doubt want to put it down several times when reading it because of it. The plot is pretty straight forward for a detective novel although it''s certainly not predictable. I really enjoy Strike as a character as well as his assistant Robin. I think the potential is there but Rowling should go back to the drawing board for the next book.

My biggest issue is the book''s length. Nearly 600 pages is far too long, Especially when there''s quite a bit of filler in it. She should have went for a 400-500 page length instead and it would have make for a much quicker and satisfying read. Hopefully she tries to do that for the next book. And yes I have already bought the next book. Despite my average review, I liked the characters enough to give them another shot.
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Adam M. Smith
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A terrible ending ruins the book
Reviewed in the United States on August 5, 2018
This book is decently written and engaging up until the big reveal where everything falls apart. This is a detective story in the Holmes style, where the case is solved at the end using evidence that is never revealed to the reader. I strongly dislike when the... See more
This book is decently written and engaging up until the big reveal where everything falls apart.

This is a detective story in the Holmes style, where the case is solved at the end using evidence that is never revealed to the reader. I strongly dislike when the author is not clever enough to hide the crime within what is presented and instead has to take the reader out of the equation to make sure their twist has some payoff.

I could forgive this, but the books final reveals are so idiotic they ruin all that had previously been read.

I’d skip this one.
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Gregory Baird
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
“The dead could only speak through the mouths of those left behind, and through the signs they left scattered behind them.”
Reviewed in the United States on August 20, 2016
Cormoran Strike is not having a good time of it. His turbulent relationship has come to an end and he''s sleeping in his office. He''s on the verge of losing that office because business has been tough, and even though Strike could rely on military benefits from the tour in... See more
Cormoran Strike is not having a good time of it. His turbulent relationship has come to an end and he''s sleeping in his office. He''s on the verge of losing that office because business has been tough, and even though Strike could rely on military benefits from the tour in Afghanistan that left him missing one leg, he''s determined to make it on his own. A temp agency has just sent him an exceedingly capable assistant named Robin, but he can''t afford to pay her and may lose her.

Right on cue, the client of Strike''s dreams walks through the door and promises to solve all his problems if he''ll look into the apparent suicide of world-famous supermodel Lula Landry. The central mystery is presented as the old ''locked room'' scenario: as far as anyone can tell, Lula was alone in her apartment and no one could have entered the building, gotten to the third floor, pushed her out the window, and escaped back down to the lobby without being seen by security or the other tenants, who were hysterical over Lula''s swan dive. The three other people in the building are all accounted for thanks to their own accounts of what happened, but one of them claims to have heard Lula screaming at someone before the fall--which should be impossible because of all the soundproof barriers between them at the time. It''s up to Strike to penetrate the mystery and find out what went on in that building.

You could argue that this novel is overly long and unnecessarily slow, but it only seems that way because so much of the genre is overly concerned with fast pacing and constant cliffhangers. Cuckoo''s Calling grabs your attention the old-fashioned way and holds it without any tricks. It feels gratifying. The payoff: immense character depth that makes you want to hang in for the sequels. Cuckoo also eschews the ''final twist'' formula that has, frankly, become tired. While that presents challenges of its own that don''t all work, it makes Cuckoo a refreshing read.

Head to my blog at SupposedlyFun.com for an expanded version of this review.

Grade: B
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Top reviews from other countries

Matt Jardine, author of 'How to be a Buddhist Millionaire' (Winner of the Firebird Book Award)
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not since reading ''Love in a time of Cholera'' have I enjoyed description like this...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 6, 2019
As an author of non-fiction books, I thought it was high time that I took on the writing of a fiction novel as my next challenge. My agent had suggested it previously, but now I was ready. In his book ''On Writing, Stephan King suggests that all authors should do two things...See more
As an author of non-fiction books, I thought it was high time that I took on the writing of a fiction novel as my next challenge. My agent had suggested it previously, but now I was ready. In his book ''On Writing, Stephan King suggests that all authors should do two things to improve their craft: read and write, a lot. I was interested to see how JK Rowling under the pseudonym of Robert Galbraith (sorry if this is a plot spoiler for you), would handle the transition from writing for children to adults. I''ll tell you how well she managed it: I became so engrossed in the first of the series of Cormoran Strike detective novels that I forgot about studying her work and just enjoyed it. You don''t need me to summarise the story, after all, that''s what the back cover is for, but I will say that I am in awe of Galbraith/ Rowling. I have not since reading ''Love in a time of Cholera'' by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, found another author who makes a detailed description of the ''mundane'' as entertaining as Galbraith. it''s an unbelievably tricky skill to walk the tight rope between superfluous and necessary description (I know all too well, often falling the wrong side). I still don''t l know how she does it, but now I''m too busy reading the strike novels solely for pleasure to care. PS: I sent the book to my dad in Cornwall who is now also hooked! Enjoy. Matt :)
52 people found this helpful
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Catherine
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Lightning can Strike twice
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 29, 2020
Let’s get this out the way- I’m a huge Harry Potter fan. I used to manage the children’s section in my local bookshop, and I read every kids book going. I would tell all my customers the same thing- Harry is the best. You can’t beat it. Having said that...I prefer Corm....See more
Let’s get this out the way- I’m a huge Harry Potter fan. I used to manage the children’s section in my local bookshop, and I read every kids book going. I would tell all my customers the same thing- Harry is the best. You can’t beat it. Having said that...I prefer Corm. Seriously, how does JK do it? She has a masterful grasp of plot, character, pacing, the works. I am also constantly amazed by how good she is at coming up with character names! The story is artful in it’s simplicity. Model dies after hurtling from a balcony, did she fall or was she pushed? Add a complex cast of starry, shallow, money hungry, a-moral characters and you have a great yarn ahead of you. The main reason it’s so compelling is the man himself, Cormoran Strike. It’s hard to create a detective without being cliched, and somehow JK has done it. Who knew a one legged army vet with a penchant for beautiful, psychotic women would be so interesting to read about. I also love Robin, who manages in this book to be wide eyed and eager without going full Enid Blyton. Stellar as always. I recommend it to everyone. (Special mention to Robert Glenister, best audiobook reader I’ve ever heard)
28 people found this helpful
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Leigh
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not as Magical as HP
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 9, 2018
The book is written in third person narration and written from the perspectives of Cormoran Strike and his assistant Robin Ellacott. I found the writing style quite difficult, it was written in the same style as the Harry Potter series, with the same kind of descriptions...See more
The book is written in third person narration and written from the perspectives of Cormoran Strike and his assistant Robin Ellacott. I found the writing style quite difficult, it was written in the same style as the Harry Potter series, with the same kind of descriptions being used, for example these are the first two sentences, The buzz in the street was like the humming of flies. Photographers stood massed behind barriers patrolled by police, their long-snouted cameras poised, their breath rising like steam." Which to me seems quite awkward and it just doesn''t sit right with what the book is about and its general tone. To me the writing style for Harry Potter helped add to the magic of the story, it enriched it, here it just seems out of place and distracts from the story. The story focuses on Cormoran Strike and his P.I business. He is asked by a former class mate''s brother to investigate the death of his sister, who was a supermodel and which the police have decided was a suicide. We then go along with Cormoran as he investigates her death. I did this like this book, it was a good read and Rowling weaves quite a few different plot points together well and we get to know the both Cormoran and Robin quite well, as there is a lot of their backstory in the book. The plot isn''t massively complicated though and while there are a few twists and turns as the events unfold, it all feels a bit underwhelming in the end. I found there was also a little bit of spitefulness in Rowling''s writing style too, towards many of the characters, mainly the female ones and the celebrities, while there seems to be hints of outward dislike to Rowling''s press in the book. I can''t really put my finger on exactly what it was, but there seemed to be an edge of smugness and spitefulness while Rowling is narrating scenes involving them. I will be reading the next book in the series as I am intrigued enough by the characters of Cormoran (even though he seems to be a copy of Hagrid, less the half giant part of course) and Robin.
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Jasmine T
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Dull and derivative.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 23, 2019
I bought this book because so many of my friends and colleagues were raving about the Cormoran Strike series and getting excited about the release of the fourth book and I had to keep warning them not to reveal any spoilers. And the Harry Potter series is definitely well...See more
I bought this book because so many of my friends and colleagues were raving about the Cormoran Strike series and getting excited about the release of the fourth book and I had to keep warning them not to reveal any spoilers. And the Harry Potter series is definitely well constructed and worth reading. Plus, I like a good detective story, so it seemed like a sure thing. Unfortunately, this is *not* a good detective story. It is a very mediocre one, with a plot that owes much to the infinitely superior ''An Unsuitable Job for a Woman''. The characters are unappealing: Strike reminds me of Cracker-without-the-charm (which may be because Galbraith/Rowling is rewriting Hagrid who was also played by Robbie Coltrane) and her only way of letting us know that Robin isn''t nice-but-dim is to repeatedly tell us ''she asked intelligently'', ''she looked round intelligently'', ''she listened intelligently'', &c. Honestly, the lady doth protest too much. So I''m now going to let my friends and colleagues sing the praises of this series to high heaven and reveal as many spoilers as their hearts desire -- no skin off my nose: I won''t be wasting my time reading any more of this disappointing series. Ms Rowling should, I feel, stick to children''s fiction which is where her true talents lie.
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SusannahB
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Enter Cormoran Strike
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 24, 2020
In J.K.Rowling''s/Robert Galbraith''s ''The Cuckoo''s Calling'' the reader is introduced to Cormoran Strike, an Afghanistan veteran who has lost part of a leg and who now works as a private detective, and one with a personal life that is in a bit of a mess. Enter strawberry...See more
In J.K.Rowling''s/Robert Galbraith''s ''The Cuckoo''s Calling'' the reader is introduced to Cormoran Strike, an Afghanistan veteran who has lost part of a leg and who now works as a private detective, and one with a personal life that is in a bit of a mess. Enter strawberry blonde, curvaceous Robin Ellacott, who is newly engaged to stolid fiance, Matthew, and who arrives to work as a temp for Strike - a job she finds fascinating, despite Matthew''s criticism of Cormoran Strike and the work itself. When Strike is visited by John Bristow, the older brother of a childhood friend of Strike''s and asks him to investigate the death of his famous supermodel sister, Lula Landry - a death that was classified as suicide by the police three months ago, but which John Bristow is convinced was murder - Strike and Robin become involved in case that brings them into the orbit of a whole range of characters including supermodels, rockstars, film makers, rappers, fashion designers et al, alongside those whose lot in life is much less glamorous. Robin, despite noticing that Strike''s private life is in a shambles, admires the detective for his diligence and orderliness in the line of duty and, keen to become involved in his investigations, she finds herself taking on much more than would normally be expected by an office temp - something that does not go unnoticed by Strike, who is surprised by her initiative and resourcefulness, and also something that does not go unnoticed by Matthew who resents Robin''s commitment to her new job and her new boss. But was Lula Landry murdered, as her brother insists? Or did the incredibly beautiful young woman, whose so-called private life was a very troubled one and who was constantly hounded by the press, decide to end her own life? The last time I read something by J.K.Rowling was years ago when I read the Harry Potter books to my son - who absolutely loved the series and I enjoyed reading them to him; however, when the author moved to writing adult fiction I must admit I had no real interest in reading them. This was, for me, a fairly average crime novel: the plot was not hugely original (and I had little difficulty working out who the perpetrator of the crime was), the troubled detective with a messy private life is one we''ve seen many times before, and some of the supporting characters were rather stereotypical. That''s not to say there weren''t parts to the novel that interested me and kept me entertained, but the plaudits on the book''s cover and on the inside pages ("wonderfully fresh and funny"; "one of the must unique and compelling detectives I''ve come across in years"; "unsurprisingly excellent"and so forth) led me to expect more from this than it actually delivered. I do have a couple of the sequels in this series which I bought together with this particular title for my son who is now old enough to read adult novels and expressed an interest in the Cormoran Strike books (although the excessive amount of four-lettered words has made me reluctant to hand them over!) and as I''ve now bought them I may well read them at some point, but I have other books that I am more excited about reading before I start on these. 3 Stars.
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